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WHEN YOUR HELP GOES OUT OF ACTION..... The joy of becoming Director, Breast Surgical Oncology, dissipated into thin air when my help did not turn up for work citing an excruciating back ache. And then all hell broke loose, at least for me, as I realised that a whole new vista of mountains of work had piled up in front of me. My mother in law who is past 75 did her best to restore order but at that age, speed is not on your side. The morning hours between 6 and 7.30 am is nothing short of high speed roller coaster with three people with contrasting needs, rushing off to their respective places of work. One of these people is also me but I was the only one riding the roller coaster. Now I know why the goddesses have multiple arms, symbolic of the multitasking geniuses women are. I had exactly an hour and a half in which to don the cape of Superwoman! I would have to conjure up six dishes. Each of us would eat a different thing and carry yet another thing for lunch. Spoilt brats, each one of us 😯but blame it on the ever complying help. If this variety in dishes was not enough, my obsessive mind with a fetish for cleanliness would go about setting the house right, ironing out the last crease on the bed and cleaning the bathroom, till the tiles gleamed and the arms hurt. 😱My husband and daughter would look on trying to tell me that my obsession was not their problem-meaning, they would not help!🤨 Out of breath and sweating, I would now get ready for that job, I am trained for and love doing.I would arrive in hospital, without a trace of the battle that I was embroiled in not too long ago. Nobody wants to know that you have just completed a day’s work before coming to the hospital. I am not looking for compassion but this is my tribute to all the women who strive endlessly to make the lives of their loved ones better and then go to work and excel there as well. Breathe ladies and take good care of yourselves!While I love being a woman, I really hope my help comes back soon!
WOMEN SHOULD BE ALLOWED TO MAKE THEIR CHOICES.............. I see a lot of lady patients in my practice since I deal with breast cancer and other breast related conditions all the time. What has struck me as the rule rather than the exception, is that, women don't have a complete say in matters dealing with not just their breasts but their life.....whether she should keep her breast or sacrifice it, whether she should go for chemotherapy or not, how much should she be told about the disease etc. etc.The people involved in these crucial decisions involve men ranging from a husband to the father-in-law to a second degree male relative or sometimes even an 'educated' male neighbor. Women empowerment is the only answer....her issues are her own, her body, mind and intellect are all her own.Only she must be allowed the right to decide what is good for her, with gentle gestures of support from her immediate family.
Delhi Breast Oncology Group will meet formally tomorrow and will hold its first CME at Max Hospital Patparganj, Delhi. I have had the pleasure of putting together a group which has been the dream of many like minded people.Tomorrow, there will be discussions on the formal structure of this group. We will meet on the first saturday of every 2nd month in all partnering institutes in alphabetical order. I will post the case discussions here. More from me tomorrow. For further details-please contact Dr Geeta Kadayaprath, Head, Breast Surgical Oncology, Max Cancer Centre, Patparganj, Delhi
Today, the first Delhi Breast Oncology Group (DBOG) CME was held in Max Patparganj, Delhi. There is a palpable enthusiasm in the creation of this group which will be one of the subspecialty arms of the Oncology Forum. The meeting started with myself introducing the proposed functional unit of DBOG. The proposal was to have coordinators for various tasks assisted by committees.There will be stock taking at each CME to be held on the first saturday, every two months. The Secretary will coordinate the pre-CME meetings at each of the CMEs. The CME itself was an academic feast with 3 case discussions and review of literature relevant to each topic. Dr Vineeta Goel, Radiation Oncologist at Max Cancer Centre, Patparganj, presented the relevance of radiation in 1-3 positive axillary nodes. Dr Randeep Singh, Medical Oncologist at Max Cancer Centre, Patparganj, presented a case of metastatic triple positive breast cancer and the current treatment options and Dr Rohan Khandelwal, Breast Surgeon at Max Cancer Centre, Saket presented a case of Triple negative breast cancer and brought in Dr Amit Verma, Genetic consultant, to unravel the rogue pathways involved in Triple negative breast cancer. The meeting ended with Dr Vaishali Zamre, Senior Consultant, Surgical Oncology, Action Balaji Hospital, Delhi, accepting the responsibility of holding the next meeting at Action Balaji Hospital. The presence of 80 attendees at this CME was a reaffirmation of the fact that like minded people need to work together to achieve larger goals.A beginning has been made.....and there is a lot to do to make big strides in the right direction. I thank all the participants for being part of this endeavor and hope to see you all on 7th March, 2015 at Action Balaji. For further details, please contact Dr Geeta Kadayaprath, Head, Breast Surgical Oncology, Max Cancer Centre, Patparganj Delhi
Before leaving the hospital, you will be given a prescription for relief of pain after the procedure. You may take Extra Strength Tylenol® instead if that provides sufficient relief. Do not take aspirin or products containing aspirin for the first three days after the procedure. Dr. Geeta Kadayaprath - Best Breast Cancer Consultant in Delhi
Stirring Souls - Bliss Foundation - Breast Cancer Awareness Group in Delhi Bliss Foundation held its first fundraiser on 29th Sept 2017 at LTG auditorium, Copernicus Marg, Delhi. Mame Khan, the famous Rajasthani folk singer was the performer of the day. Many large hearted people and organisations came forward to help the cause. Thankful to each of them.
I am a big fan of Angelina Jolie. So what is the big deal about it? Half of the human race is possibly her fan..her looks and her acting prowess has had the world swooning. I am her fan for a different reason. I haven’t followed her movies, her drop dead gorgeous looks or her personal life but I admire her for her courage. Some years ago, this remarkable lady announced to the world that she is having both her breasts removed. She knew that she was carrying a genetic mutation which made her susceptible to breast and ovarian cancer. Her family history was strong for both breast and ovarian cancer and once she tested positive for the mutation, she knew she carried a 60-80% risk of developing either of these cancers. She was faced with the prospect of prophylactic breast and ovarian surgeries. I can only imagine the sleepless nights, the battle within-to do or not to do, several rounds of long discussions with her doctors, family and friends, the impact on her career which relied heavily on glamour, her children... and so much more. And then she made that decision to have both her breasts removed and subsequently her ovaries. She shocked the world but at the same time catapulted herself to that realm of courage and fortitude that rarely people of her standing dare to tread. I joined her fan club and her story of courage became the benchmark for women caught in a similar situation. Why I recalled this story was when I encountered my own Angelina Jolie. This young lady of 35 had a very strong family history of breast, ovarian and colon cancer on her maternal side.Her husband was gutted when she was diagnosed with breast cancer. I advised her for a genetic consult while planning for her surgery. The genetic consultant had barely advised her gene testing and was discussing the possible implications, when she said that she had made up her mind. She very calmly told the consultant that irrespective of what the test says she was going ahead with bilateral prophylactic mastectomies and bilateral ovarian surgeries in the same sitting. She came to be and conveyed the same to me. It shook me inwardly and took me a while to gain my composure as her husband stood by her, rock solid in his support of her decision. ‘COURAGE’ as a word probably does not do justice to the tenacity with which one arrives at this supremely difficult decision. I have done these surgeries before and this one was certainly not the last. Such decisions are rationalised within the multidisciplinary board, the molecular oncologists, the psychologists, the family and most importantly, the patients!! While I see more of these Angeina Jolie clones, I will always hope and pray that these amazing ladies’ decision translates into long, meaningful and inspiring lives!
Today I complete 22 years of marriage and I thought this an opportune time to look back at my life with satisfaction. My marriage was arranged by my parents through mutual friends. My husband is an engineer and the one time we met before the process began, he had decided and I was still unsure. I was trying to peer into the crystal ball, hoping to figure out how this arrangement would work for me. I was training to be a surgeon, not a choice many sensible women at that time made. The questions kept me awake- would he understand the demands of my profession, the late hours, the middle-of-the-night zipping to hospital to deal with an emergency etc? Would he understand my need to study further, maybe go abroad and work hard to give myself a full fledged career? His being an engineer did not help the cause at all. And then I stopped thinking and gave in to the wishes of my parents. When I look back at those 22 years gone by, I have plenty to be grateful for. For a woman to pursue a full fledged career is never easy anywhere in the world.What you make of it has plenty to do with the support you have. The support I had was truly unconditional. I completed my post graduation after marriage. My in-laws wanted me to carry on, unhindered, with my studies.FRCS soon followed with my parents chipping in to look after my little daughter. I went for a year long fellowship to London, leaving my daughter behind with my husband and mother in law. And did I stop? And did he stop me from pursuing my dreams? Not once! We are all imperfect in our own ways but valuing people for their strengths is what sustains relationships. His presence in my life has been the star and I can only wish him the very best that life has on offer!!
RISING TO THE OCCASION Yesterday, this beautiful young lady of 33 walked into my room. I could see she had had chemotherapy as a smart bandana adorned her bald head. She was accompanied by her mother and her husband. Her dazzling smile and her confidence as she took me through the journey of nursing a 6 month old baby, of discovering a lump which was labelled benign at first, of the lump growing in a month and she, of her own volition going for a biopsy and discovering she had breast cancer, shook me! She had visited 3 or 4 hospitals for various reasons and is on the verge of completing chemotherapy. She had come to meet me to discuss the surgical options and the implications. She told me that she was scared of needles and pain but her composed demeanour conveyed something else. I could see, I was having the privilege of interacting with a woman of utmost strength, resilience, poise and maturity way beyond her years. Her smile never left her face. Her mother contributed positively in equal measure but the sadness in her eyes of seeing her little girl suffer did not escape my notice. She required to have an injection to up her white cell count. She went to the nurse in the treatment room for the same and showed her a prescription for the same on her mobile, from a different hub of the same centre as ours. She refused without thinking what she could have done to help her-a cardinal mistake! The nurse was following a process, which said no medication without prescription, which was fine. What she did not do, was figure out a method to solve the problem. She could have got a print out, on our institute’s letter head and cross checked with the prescribing doctor and administered the medication. What happened next was no surprise. The mother was outraged. She had accompanied her daughter across half of Delhi for a consult and this Nay from the sister, truly rocked her frail boat. She truly took the nurse to task for being unhelpful and uncaring. The situation was brought to my notice.The matter was sorted out, a printout of the prescription was taken and the injection was done. However, the bitter taste in the mouth remained! I know for a certainty, that the only people who go to hospital, happily, are doctors and the staff at work. The ailing come, as they don’t have an option. They entrust us with the job of sending them back, cured or relieved of their ailment. We, as caregivers, should never forget to look beyond and see the footprints that they have left behind, as they walk the difficult path to meet us. There is a story, sometimes, most heart rending, that we need to know- a story that should only raise our level of empathy. Each one of us has to walk that extra mile, go beyond our call of duty to ensure that we do our best for the person sitting across the table, entrusting us with making some of the toughest decisions of their lives. We, as professionals, have to really rise to the occasion, every single time!
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