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Incision care Small pieces of tape (called steri-strips) will remain over the incision site and may be removed 10 to 14 days after surgery. The incision should be kept clean and dry for one week after surgery. Therefore, we recommend sponge baths instead of showers the first week. You may bathe in a bathtub if you are able to keep the area dry. Look for redness and swelling, which may be signs of infection. Do not go swimming until you have discussed this with your surgeon at your follow-up appointment. Dr. Geeta Kadayaprath - Best Breast Cancer Specialist in Delhi
Follow-up Care After Breast Cancer Surgery You may be discharged from the hospital with an external drainage device in place. The drain will continuously remove fluid from a catheter at the surgery site into an external collection device. You will be responsible for emptying this collection device. Your nurse or health care provider will discuss how to care for your drain before you are discharged from the hospital. Dr. Geeta Kadayaprath - Best Breast Cancer Surgeon in Delhi
It is kind of frightening when cancer does not fit into the rule book. Painless lump is the usual presentation in breast cancer. So, when a 31 year old walks into your clinic with an exquisitely tender lump and an ultrasound report proclaiming it to be an abscess in evolution, you are tempted to believe it. However the antenna that you nurture carefully with years of experience tells you otherwise..THIS IS JUST NOT RIGHT.....The tender lump, the tender round lymph node. A repeat ultrasound done by my radiologist colleague and a core biopsy confirm my worst fears.. I am dealing with cancer in this unsuspecting young lady. Breaks my heart but I have a job to do!
Yesterday I visited my niece and was on the phone talking to my patients, sorting things for them. When I finished, she asked me, ‘Isn’t your profession stressful?’ I was quick to say NO. The conviction in my tone has taken many years to come. I recall my early days as an oncologist and in particular, this vivacious young lady who had a relatively advanced colorectal cancer with involvement of her ovaries. She had undergone surgery elsewhere, 4 weeks prior to coming to our unit. Her abdominal wound lay open and was pouring out fecal matter and abrasive intestinal juices, consuming her skin.I could not come to terms with the unfairness of the situation, then. Why was this young lady with the most sparkling, hopeful eyes dealing with this horror? I wanted to pull her out of this mess and diligently did my best to improve her nutrition, take care of her wound and her medication. She and I would talk a lot- her dreams, her aspirations, her twins, her loving husband, her family...we became good friends! Her surgery was planned and executed well. She was recovering well and she wanted to be home to celebrate her twins’ birthday. I assured her she would. And then that day arrived, when she walked. She walked for the first time after 8 weeks. I was thrilled and went home thinking she would be out of the ICU the next day. I was going up to the hospital the next day when I got a call that she had had a cardiac arrest. I thought I had heard wrong. I ran up to the ICU and before I reached, she was gone. Pulmonary embolism had taken her away. I was distraught and I cried, rather howled, like I had lost one of my own.An elderly physician put an arm on my shoulder and said, ’ This is certainly not the last time you will have to deal with this. Don’t get attached to the outcome of what you do. Do your best but remain detached from the outcome’. Those words have stuck and I have grown since. My focus is entirely on what I can do for the person who sits across the table and entrusts his or her life to me. I do my best to understand the problem, execute treatment, handhold them and try and do whatever I can to make the experience as seamless as possible. Cancer outcomes are never a 100%. You do lose some at the end of the day but if I have contributed to making their life easier through their suffering, I have done something worthwhile. While it is easy to be overwhelmed by these difficult situations, I need to remain detached from them so that I can do more for those who need help. I have come a long way since, but it is not as if I am not affected by what happens to my patients, anymore. It is just that I have taken better charge of the emotional me and replaced it, not entirely, with the professional me!
RISING TO THE OCCASION Yesterday, this beautiful young lady of 33 walked into my room. I could see she had had chemotherapy as a smart bandana adorned her bald head. She was accompanied by her mother and her husband. Her dazzling smile and her confidence as she took me through the journey of nursing a 6 month old baby, of discovering a lump which was labelled benign at first, of the lump growing in a month and she, of her own volition going for a biopsy and discovering she had breast cancer, shook me! She had visited 3 or 4 hospitals for various reasons and is on the verge of completing chemotherapy. She had come to meet me to discuss the surgical options and the implications. She told me that she was scared of needles and pain but her composed demeanour conveyed something else. I could see, I was having the privilege of interacting with a woman of utmost strength, resilience, poise and maturity way beyond her years. Her smile never left her face. Her mother contributed positively in equal measure but the sadness in her eyes of seeing her little girl suffer did not escape my notice. She required to have an injection to up her white cell count. She went to the nurse in the treatment room for the same and showed her a prescription for the same on her mobile, from a different hub of the same centre as ours. She refused without thinking what she could have done to help her-a cardinal mistake! The nurse was following a process, which said no medication without prescription, which was fine. What she did not do, was figure out a method to solve the problem. She could have got a print out, on our institute’s letter head and cross checked with the prescribing doctor and administered the medication. What happened next was no surprise. The mother was outraged. She had accompanied her daughter across half of Delhi for a consult and this Nay from the sister, truly rocked her frail boat. She truly took the nurse to task for being unhelpful and uncaring. The situation was brought to my notice.The matter was sorted out, a printout of the prescription was taken and the injection was done. However, the bitter taste in the mouth remained! I know for a certainty, that the only people who go to hospital, happily, are doctors and the staff at work. The ailing come, as they don’t have an option. They entrust us with the job of sending them back, cured or relieved of their ailment. We, as caregivers, should never forget to look beyond and see the footprints that they have left behind, as they walk the difficult path to meet us. There is a story, sometimes, most heart rending, that we need to know- a story that should only raise our level of empathy. Each one of us has to walk that extra mile, go beyond our call of duty to ensure that we do our best for the person sitting across the table, entrusting us with making some of the toughest decisions of their lives. We, as professionals, have to really rise to the occasion, every single time!
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