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I was talking to this gentleman who sat across me in the OPD a month ago.His mother has been diagnosed with breast cancer and I was going over the details of treatment with him. He wanted to know how much the entire process would cost and how his mother was morbidly scared about the whole process, considering the fact that his father had recently completed treatment for Cancer of the voice box.During the conversation, I gathered he was their only son, working as a lecturer in an Engineering college and taking care of his parents. He had a sister, who lived in another city. What amazed me was his cool demeanour, his highly organised approach to the problem, his intense concern for his parents and the urge to get things done at the earliest. I could not help but ask him if this situation did not stress him out.He had a job to perform, his own young family to look after and if that was not enough, two ageing parents with cancer. His response was, to say the least, like a whiff of fresh air, in times where many old parents are left to fend for themselves in Old People’s’ Homes. He said, ‘Doctor, I look at this as my good fortune. I see this as a blessing as not many get the opportunity to serve their parents. I feel no stress’. He meant every word of it as I saw him handhold his mother lovingly throughout the process of treatment. I am honoured to know this gentleman. I thank him for restoring my faith in humanity and epitomising the real meaning of ‘Sevabhav’! #Breast Cancer #Max Hospital #Patparganj #Vaishali #East Delhi #Sevabhav
Another year comes to an end.... a year full of challenges, some met ....some transferred to the next year.Professionally, I made an important decision ... of focussing my energies at one centre instead of hopping between two. Now, I head the breast services at Max Cancer Centre, Patparganj, alone. I am able to be involved in the entire process of entry to exit of my patients with breast cancer.The Support Group meetings, the academic meetings, the surgical work, the post operative care, the process of auditing my own work to constantly improve the care, have taken off and I believe these are a few steps in the right direction.The endeavour to excel continues...... The new year beckons.....It will be 2015 in a few hours. Tomorrow will be the first Breast support group meeting of the year. The enthusiasm of my champions is all pervasive and we will, together, celebrate life with renewed vigor and new hopes.Breast cancer will be a forgotten word....smiles, chatter, dancing, eating, sharing and a sense of camaradarie will dominate proceedings. I am looking forward to it..All are welcome to join!!! For further details, please contact Dr Geeta Kadayaprath, Head, Breast Services, Max Cancer Centre, Patparganj, Delhi
It was Breast Support Group meeting on Thursday, 18.12.14.The Champions who had been through the journey of breast cancer had come in to encourage the ones who had just started treatment. What is exceptional about this interaction is that the conviction of being able to go through treatment goes up manifold when the ones who have gone through the process and have recovered completely, counsel the new kids on the block. I believe it is the fear of the unknown and the feeling of isolation that puts you on the back foot. The interesting methods of coping with the situation related by the champions, is very encouraging. The smiles, laughters, jokes...... all give the impending process of treatment, the much desired sanity!!! For more information on breast cancer, please contact Dr Geeta Kadayaprath, Delhi, India
Yesterday I visited my niece and was on the phone talking to my patients, sorting things for them. When I finished, she asked me, ‘Isn’t your profession stressful?’ I was quick to say NO. The conviction in my tone has taken many years to come. I recall my early days as an oncologist and in particular, this vivacious young lady who had a relatively advanced colorectal cancer with involvement of her ovaries. She had undergone surgery elsewhere, 4 weeks prior to coming to our unit. Her abdominal wound lay open and was pouring out fecal matter and abrasive intestinal juices, consuming her skin.I could not come to terms with the unfairness of the situation, then. Why was this young lady with the most sparkling, hopeful eyes dealing with this horror? I wanted to pull her out of this mess and diligently did my best to improve her nutrition, take care of her wound and her medication. She and I would talk a lot- her dreams, her aspirations, her twins, her loving husband, her family...we became good friends! Her surgery was planned and executed well. She was recovering well and she wanted to be home to celebrate her twins’ birthday. I assured her she would. And then that day arrived, when she walked. She walked for the first time after 8 weeks. I was thrilled and went home thinking she would be out of the ICU the next day. I was going up to the hospital the next day when I got a call that she had had a cardiac arrest. I thought I had heard wrong. I ran up to the ICU and before I reached, she was gone. Pulmonary embolism had taken her away. I was distraught and I cried, rather howled, like I had lost one of my own.An elderly physician put an arm on my shoulder and said, ’ This is certainly not the last time you will have to deal with this. Don’t get attached to the outcome of what you do. Do your best but remain detached from the outcome’. Those words have stuck and I have grown since. My focus is entirely on what I can do for the person who sits across the table and entrusts his or her life to me. I do my best to understand the problem, execute treatment, handhold them and try and do whatever I can to make the experience as seamless as possible. Cancer outcomes are never a 100%. You do lose some at the end of the day but if I have contributed to making their life easier through their suffering, I have done something worthwhile. While it is easy to be overwhelmed by these difficult situations, I need to remain detached from them so that I can do more for those who need help. I have come a long way since, but it is not as if I am not affected by what happens to my patients, anymore. It is just that I have taken better charge of the emotional me and replaced it, not entirely, with the professional me!
Breast cancer is a growing problem in India and all of Asia and threatens to deluge our health services by 2030.What is worrisome is that we do not have the resources to match the growing incidence. We have to start looking for indigenous solutions to our problem of breast cancer. We do have a good pool of talent especially in the autonomous institutions and the private sector, doing good work but there is very little support to encourage them to pool together data and make sense of it. The numbers that we see every year should, ideally, have provided us with a lot of answers, had we pooled our data and presented it to the world. In an attempt to push this possibility, I brought together like minded surgeons and created a group, the Delhi Breast Oncology Group (DBOG), on 6th November, 2014.We are in the process of giving it a formal shape and the first step in this direction will be taken on the 3rd of January 2014, when we meet again. Max Cancer Centre will host this meeting and the first CME(case discussions) as well on 3.1.15. All clinicians with an interest in breast cancer ( Surgeons, medical oncologists, radiation oncologists, radiologists, pathologists etc.)are cordially invited to attend this program. For further information, please contact Dr Geeta Kadayaprath, Head , Breast Surgical Oncology, Max Cancer Centre, Patparganj, Delhi, India
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